The Mexican Government Asked Street Artists To Paint 200 Houses To Unite Community.

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“A youth organization that’s been known to use graffiti as a means of expression has teamed up with the government of Mexico to rehabilitate Palmitas, a town in the Pachuca district. Under the moniker “Germen Crew,” the group painted 209 houses, or twenty-thousand square meters of facade, into a single rainbow mural.

According to streetartnews, the impact has been extremely positive: 452 families, or 1808 people, were affected by this project, resulting in violence amongst youths being entirely eradicated. The group, whose name literally means “germ crew,” have made community involvement a priority, which could partially explain the good results.”

Beautiful idea. Love this so much.

Source: boredpanda.com

Front Range Farmers Support Standing Rock Water Protectors. So beautiful.

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Rod Brueske, of La Joyia Farm and Mark Guttridge, of Ollin Farms, both in Longmont, have joined forces with other local farmers to provide fresh produce to the water protectors in Standing Rock in North Dakota.

Guttridge “A lot of the farmers down here were talking and I think we can definitely understand the motivation that the protectors have up there to lead these sort of gatherings and we just want to show support and what better way than to send up some of the good food that came from us, tending the earth in Boulder County and given our effort down here to have the healthiest soils and healthiest water possibility and so we just want to show support.”

Over 100lbs of winter squash along with winter radishes and carrots and pie pumpkins were loaded onto Brueske’s truck at Ollin Farms to deliver to Standing Rock. Guttridge says that throughout the week, customers at the farm have donated blankets, batteries and gas money as well.

Before setting off for North Dakota, Brueske stopped by the farmers market at Union Station in Denver on the last day of the season and loaded even more fresh produce from 10 farmers for the Standing Rock protectors. “Mark got us a good start but my objective is to at least take…I’d like to see 2,000 lbs of food to go up to support our protectors.”

In all, close to 1,000 lbs of food was delivered to Standing Rock. Brueske says that he hopes to continue to deliver food throughout the winter.

Bodhidharma laughed for seven days when he became enlightened — nonstop. His friends became very worried; they thought he had gone insane. They asked him, “What is the matter? Why are you laughing?” He said, “I am laughing because now I see the whole ridiculousness of my search. I have been searching for lives together for the truth, and it has always been within me. What I was searching for was in the seeker himself. I was looking everywhere and it was within me. I was running hither and thither and there was no need to run anywhere. I could have just calmed myself down, and it was mine. It has always been mine. From the very beginning it was within me. It is my innermost being, my very being. “The seeker is the sought — that’s why I am laughing. I cannot believe how I could remain in such a deception for so long, how I managed to be such a fool. And I am also laughing because I see all around millions of people searching in the same way — searching for bliss, for God, for truth, for nirvana — and all that they are searching and seeking and looking for can be found within themselves. There is no need to go anywhere. There is no need to do anything. Just close your eyes and look within, and the kingdom of God is yours. Hence, I cannot stop laughing.” ~ Osho

Laughing Buddhas

I love Ram Dass. Below is a beautiful story he shared on the power of unconditional love.

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So I started out on the New York thruway. I was just galumphing along in such a high state that I was hanging out with various forms of the Divine. I was doing my mantra, which I usually am doing one way or another, to remember that this isn’t the only game in town. So I’m holding onto the steering wheel and I’m keeping enough consciousness to keep the car on the road. At another part I’m singing to Krishna, who is blue, is radiant, plays the flute, is the seducer of the Beloved, all of whom we are, back into the merging with God, back into the formless. I am in ecstasy hanging out with blue Krishna, driving along the New York freeway, when I noticed in my rear view mirror a blue flashing light.

Now, there is enough of me down, so I knew it was a state trooper. I pulled over the car, and this man got out of the car and he came up to the window. I opened the window and he said, “may I see your license and registration?” I was in such a state that when I looked at him, I saw that it was Krishna who had come to give me darshan. How would Krishna come in 1970? Why not as a state trooper? Christ came as a carpenter.

So Krishna comes up and asks for my license. He can have anything, he can have my life. All he wants is my license and registration. So I give him my license and
registration, and it’s like throwing flowers at the feet of God. I am looking at him with absolute love.

So he goes back to the car and he calls home. Then he comes back and he walks around the car and he says, “what’s in that box on the seat?” I said, “they’re mints, would you like one?” He said, “well the problem is you were driving too slow on the freeway, and you’ll have to drive off the freeway if you’re going to drive this slowly.” I said, “yes, absolutely.”  I’m just looking at him with such love.

Now, if you put yourself in the role of a state trooper, how often do you suppose they are looked at with unconditional love? Especially when they’re in their uniform. So after he had finished all the deliberations, he didn’t want to leave. But he had run out of state trooper-ness. So he stood there a minute, and then he said, “great car you’ve got here!” That allowed me to get out. And we could kick and spit and hit the fenders and say, they don’t make `em now like they used to, and tell old car stories. Then we ran out of that. I could feel he still didn’t want to leave. I mean, why would you want to leave if you’re being unconditionally loved? Where are you going to go? You’ve already got what you wanted. What are you going to do? That takes care of your power needs, all of it.

So finally he runs out, he knows he’s got to come clean that he’s Krishna, so he says, “be gone with you,” which isn’t state trooper talk, but what the hell. As I get into the car and I start to drive away, he’s standing by his cruiser and I look in the mirror and he’s waving at me. Now you tell me, do you think that was a state trooper, or was that Krishna? I don’t know.

~Ram Dass

Source: https://www.ramdass.org/unconditional-love/

17-year-old Mariah Smith of Hampton, Virginia had a life-changing moment when she encountered a homeless man shivering in a parking lot: she gave him food and a blanket from her car, and left determined to do more. Now, three years later, Mariah has handed out more than 80,000 blankets and bagged lunches to homeless people in her community through the non-profit organization she started, Blankets for the Homeless.

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Mariah herself was dependent on the kindness of strangers as a child: abandoned as a newborn on Christmas Eve, she spent the first two years of her life in foster care before being adopted. When she gave away her first blanket in 2011, she realized how much difference such a small gesture could make to a person in need. “The look in his eye when I wrapped that blanket around him haunts me to this day,” she told NBC News. “It was a look of desperation and appreciation all at once.”

Her mother, Moira, helped her launch her non-profit, which is dedicated to providing blankets, food, and other necessities to homeless people in the community. Word quickly spread among the homeless community, who nicknamed her Blanket Girl. It also spread among local churches, businesses, and schools, who started contributing to her work. “We couldn’t do all that we do without the support of the community,” she says.

Now a psychology major in college, Mariah spends hours every day gathering and distributing food and blankets. She also speaks at elementary schools, universities, and Girl Scout troops to raise awareness about homelessness, letting others know how they can make a difference: “Once you help someone who’s homeless it changes your life forever,” she says. “You think about them when it rains; you think about them when it’s way too hot outside, when you can’t stand to be out there.” This Christmas season, with the help of local donors, she assembled over 850 stockings to hand out, full of supplies like toothbrushes, hats and gloves, as well as treats like cookies and personal messages of support.

In the long-term, Mariah would like to encourage others across the country to join her cause by keeping a box in their cars full of blankets, cold-weather gear, and non-perishable foods that they can give out immediately when they see someone in need. “I just want everyone to start to think about the homeless more and maybe themselves a little bit less especially in this time of year. I hope people will start opening their minds more and think about the reality that people are really going through.”

So thankful people like Mariah exist. And thanks to A Mighty Girl for this post.

“I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt … she personally called the owner of the Mocambo, and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night. She told him—and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status—that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again.” ~Ella Fitzgerald

Ella and Marilyn

Love this so much. Women helping each other succeed is such a beautiful thing.

For more than 20 years, Arnold Abbott has been feeding the homeless in his hometown of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, through his group Love Thy Neighbor. On Sunday, he was arrested under the city’s controversial new ordinance that bans public feedings and faces up to two months in jail. Arnold is 90 years old. After his arrest, he said, “These are the poorest of the poor, they have nothing, they don’t have a roof over their heads. How do you turn them away?” Abbott plans to fight the charges, just as he did when he sued the city — and won — in 1999 when it tried to stop him from feeding the homeless on the beach. “I don’t do things to purposefully aggravate the situation,” said Abbott. “I’m trying to work with the city. Any human has the right to help his fellow man.” Go Arnold!

Arnold

Thanks to Growing Bolder for this post.