“Western culture has criminalized and demonized all experiences involving altered states of consciousness and any substances that put us into an altered state of consciousness. And this is clearly a war over consciousness that’s going on. It’s clear that our societies have an investment in preventing us from exploring where altered states of consciousness will lead us. Perhaps there is a deep fear that if we do explore those altered states of consciousness, we will not accept the power structures and the fairytale illusion of material wealth that we’re all brought up to pursue as though that’s the only thing to existence. If I, as an individual, am not sovereign over my consciousness, if I cannot decide what to do with my consciousness, which is the heart of my being, then I am not free, and I need not talk about freedom or living in a free society, or such issues as democracy, if my society will not allow me to explore my consciousness. If, in an altered state of consciousness, my behavior is disruptive in the public arena, then that behavior should rightly be controlled by society. But the personal and private exploration of our own consciousness is our own business, in my view, and is not the business of the State.” ~Graham Hancock

“The duty of the individual is to accept no rule, to be the initiator of his own acts, to be responsible. Only if he does so will the society live, and change, and adapt, and survive. We are not subjects of a State founded upon law, but members of a society formed upon revolution. Revolution is our obligation: our hope of evolution.” ~Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed

“The duty of the individual is to accept no rule, to be the initiator of his own acts, to be responsible. Only if he does so will the society live, and change, and adapt, and survive. We are not subjects of a State founded upon law, but members of a society formed upon revolution. Revolution is our obligation: our hope of evolution.”  ~ Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed

Stencil Art by Kriebel

“Let us leave the orbit of yesterday, with all its struggles and its joys and memories, and let us fully enter a new moment, setting our sights on new stars, charting the course for our highest selves and contributions. Should we wish to change, let us be bold once again. Yes, let us be brave and find our moon, chasing a vision so big and unimaginable that the mere thought of it brings sweat to our palms and stuns our heart with anxiety, yet never fails to lift our soul with purpose. Under no circumstances shall we settle on challenges that fail to inspire; let them be so real and meaningful to us that we rise each day and pursue them with full intensity, until we have victory or we die. Let us be more disciplined and true, each day taking action, testing things out, failing, getting up again, failing again, learning, rising and rising and rising ever more. This is the stuff of commitment and character, the demands of real contribution. Let us have vision now to break the boundaries of all that we have ever known, lift above our own competencies and insecurities, take flight fueled only by courage and love, soar high in our service to the world.” ~Brendon Burchard

MOSCOW — Opposition to Russia’s intervention in Ukraine sparked an unexpectedly large protest march here Saturday, as tens of thousands of demonstrators waving Ukrainian, Russian and European Union flags chanted “No war!” and “Russia without Putin.” They wore armbands and ribbons in the Ukrainian colors of blue and yellow, ribbons in Russia’s white, blue and red, and the plain white ribbons that were a hallmark of the large rallies against President Vladimir Putin that blossomed and then faltered in 2012. “This is to show Ukrainian citizens our solidarity, so they will see there is another Russia, a Russia that doesn’t want war,” said Maria Lobanova, 30, who had come to the rally with her father, husband and two sons, ages 4 and 1.

MOSCOW — Opposition to Russia’s intervention in Ukraine sparked an unexpectedly large protest march here Saturday, as tens of thousands of demonstrators waving Ukrainian, Russian and European Union flags chanted “No war!” and “Russia without Putin.”  They wore armbands and ribbons in the Ukrainian colors of blue and yellow, ribbons in Russia’s white, blue and red, and the plain white ribbons that were a hallmark of the large rallies against President Vladimir Putin that blossomed and then faltered in 2012.  “This is to show Ukrainian citizens our solidarity, so they will see there is another Russia, a Russia that doesn’t want war,” said Maria Lobanova, 30, who had come to the rally with her father, husband and two sons, ages 4 and 1.